Ear care

I want my son to listen to me and hear me


There are so many doubts, fears, and uncertainties that surround childhood deafness that I believe that only who is the father or mother of a deaf child could understand what I am saying. If you've ever had a chance to see the movie Professor Hollander, you'll know what I'm talking about.

The scene in which the mother despairs of not being able to know what her deaf son wants made my heart sink. I want to hear my son. I want to know what he wants, what he thinks, I want him to listen to me, to hear me, and to know how much I love him. The scene made me reflect on what the world of a deaf child will be like.

Although we cannot see it, deafness limits, isolates and compromises people's communication with their outside world, especially when it comes to a child. A baby born deaf does not know that he is deaf. It will seem normal to live without sounds, but little by little you will need to interact with others, and seek ties of love, friendship, appreciation and consideration.

That is when problems such as loneliness, rejection and discrimination begin to experience. In the film, the son of a dedicated institute music teacher is deaf, and the mother becomes suspicious when the boy is one year old, during a street parade whose noise does not affect her baby's nap in any way. But will it be easy to suspect and detect deafness in a baby?

We cannot deny or reject the auditory stimulation that we continually receive from our environment. We are immersed in a world of speech, cars honking, instruments that sound, and an infinity of sounds that make us receive and transmit emotions. The noise of the turbines of the plane that has just passed, of the telephone that has just rung, of the washing machine, of a door that is closed, of a bird's song, everything communicates and indicates us.

How to live without these sensations? What will the life of a deaf child be like? How to treat and educate him? There are so many questions that arise ... I know that there are answers, diagnoses, and treatments. And I also know that parents of deaf children must decide what communication to have with them. Congenital or acquired, deafness has a remedy. An adequately stimulated deaf-mute child can develop a normal level of intelligence that enables him to lead a normal life, be autonomous, and study whatever he wants.

It is necessary to establish a form of language, communication, through signs, gestures and other techniques (hearing aids, implants). Therefore, an early diagnosis is highly recommended. There is no doubt that hearing impairment changes family life. Not everything is perfect in this life, but neither is it final. Everything is possible when you have patience, perseverance, and a positive attitude. Let Professor Hollander tell you.

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