First aid

The child has hit his head, how to act?


Bumps and bumps on the face are very common during childhood, especially in babies between one and two years old. They are still learning to control their body and maintain a good balance, so it is normal that when they fall they do not use their hands to stop the blow and the head is the organ that suffers the most. But, What to do if the child hits himself and a huge bump comes out?

A few days ago I was in a restaurant and I saw how a baby who was playing between the legs of his parents fell and hit his forehead with the leg of the table. Almost immediately a bump the size of a golf ball began to sprout, alarmed parents rushed to the ER, leaving the table with their plate still steaming. An hour later when we were leaving, we saw them come back, the child was fine, despite the bulky lump and they wanted to finish eating after the scare.

Head blows are defined as head trauma and, within accidents, it is the cause that most frequently determines the admission of children to the emergency room. In most cases, children receive blows that are not serious, although it is important to know how to react and what to do if it occurs since they can alter brain function:

- If it is a bruise or bump It is advisable to apply cold to the area or this magnificent solution that mothers always carry in their purse: arnica.

- If the wound is bleeding profusely and the cut is deep, it is necessary to go to the emergency room within 4 hours to be able to suture it, in case it is a small cut, it is necessary to wash the wound well and apply a cold compress.

To assess what damage the child has suffered, it is convenient to observe him especially during the first 24 hours and continue to assess his condition in the following 72. If you should go to the emergency room:

- if the child is unconscious or has lost consciousness.

- in case you are not able to maintain your balance, do not move your limbs, have tremors or do not speak correctly.

- the pain increases as time passes.

- the child vomits after the blow or continues to do so later.

- the hematoma causes the skull deformity.

- the child appears sleepy and responds less and less to stimuli.

- the pupils are not uniform.

- a bruise appears under the eyes.

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Video: My child hit their head. Is it safe for them to go to sleep? (June 2021).