First aid

How to take care of a wrist sprain in children


No matter how careful parents are, children fall, it is a fact. Their inexhaustible ability to explore, their curiosity and their lack of fear of danger, make injuries due to falls very common in childhood.

One of these common injuries in children is usually a wrist sprain. Know how you should take care of a wrist sprain in children so that the injury heals as soon as possible and without sequelae.

Sprain occurs when the ligament that joins the bones of a joint is twisted or severely strained. Ligaments are tissues that connect bones and hold them in place, as well as supporting joints.

The most common sprains in children are usually those of the ankle, knee, elbow and the one in question, the wrist sprain.

It is a frequent injury in childhood because children do not stop jumping, running, dancing, playing, skating, riding a bicycle ... and before a fall what the child tends to do is put their hands to stop the impact against the floor. This usually causes a wrist sprain, meaning one or more ligaments in the child's wrist are stretched, twisted, or torn.

If your child suffers a fall and complains of pain in the area of ​​the hand, you should put immediate remedies to Caring for a sprained wrist in children. Some symptoms that will indicate that you may have a sprained wrist are:

- The child has a swollen wrist and indicates that it hurts.

- The wrist appears to be stiff.

- Bruising or changes in skin color appear.

- If the child tries to move it, it sounds.

In this situation we can perform two actions at first:

- Go to your pediatrician to assess you and take the appropriate measures to treat you.

- Offer you the medication prescribed by your pediatrician to relieve pain, generally analgesics such as ibuprofen or paracetamol.

Your pediatrician will ask how the fall or injury occurred and examine your child's wrist. In certain cases, he will order X-rays or even an MRI if nothing is seen in the first. In the event that the child suffers a wrist sprain, the pediatrician will recommend:

- Medicines to decrease swelling and pain.

- Splint or cast to support the wrist and reestablish the damage caused.

- In the most serious cases, surgery may be necessary.

- In certain cases, physiotherapy is also recommended to help regain strength and movement of the wrist once the treatment is finished.

Again we reiterate that it will be the medical professional who makes the recommendations to follow, but you, as a parent, can:

- Ice your wrist for 15-20 minutes: Place an ice pack covered by a cloth or towel on the wrist and repeat this every hour. This will reduce swelling and pain.

- Elevate the wrist above the level of the heart, you can support the wrist on pillows to make it more comfortable.

- Insist that the child rest the wrist for at least 48 hours and avoid doing any kind of activity with that hand.

When a child has suffered a sprain in a joint, it is very possible that this injury will recur, especially if the treatment they performed the first time was not strictly adhered to or if it was not done properly. To prevent the child from going through the same thing again, you must:

- Protect the wrist when doing sports: A good wrist strap will help prevent future sprains.

- Ask the child to warm up with their hands before doing a sport like basketball, soccer, or handball.

- Teach your child to fallIf you practice a sport, such as skiing where falls are frequent, you must learn how to hit the ground to avoid injury.

- Take care of your child's diet to include the vitamins and minerals needed to maintain strong bones and joints.

You can read more articles similar to How to take care of a wrist sprain in children, in the First Aid On Site category.


Video: Not Sure if Its a Break or a Sprain (June 2021).