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First aid

What to do if your child has a febrile seizure


Your child has a fever and suddenly He begins to convulse with jerky movements throughout his body that he can barely control. You see with horror that even his gaze seems lost ... and you go into a state of panic.

Yes, it is one of the worst experiences thousands of parents have gone through: the so-called febrile seizure. Would you know how to recognize it and act correctly when faced with one of these episodes?

This video shows us how to recognize a febrile seizure in a baby: the little one begins to suffer spasms in the body. His muscles contract and he cannot control them and his lips turn purple. The episode of spasms or febrile convulsions is very unpleasant, since the little one loses control of the body, the eyes and may even lose consciousness. But although they are so flashy and scary, at first, they are not dangerous.

Sometimes the febrile seizure appears in a milder form: the child's body stiffens or he simply rolls his eyes. They usually occur in children under 5 years, and they remit approximately 10 minutes after their start. They do not leave sequelae or lead to epilepsy episodes. Remember that fever, although it is alarming and we may be scared, is deep down an ally against infections.

- Lay the baby or children on their side so that they breathe better

- If he is on his back, make sure to tilt his head so that the saliva does not cause him to suffocate

- You can grab him, but not immobilize him

- Do not put any object in your mouth

- Do not put him in the bathtub with cold water

- Do not transfer him in the middle of a febrile seizure

- You can give paracetamol to lower the fever and help you with wet cloths (but warm, not cold)

- Try to remove clothes that are not warm

- As soon as the febrile seizure passes, take the child to the pediatrician to analyze his condition.

You can read more articles similar to What to do if your child has a febrile seizure, in the First Aid On Site category.


Video: Febrile Seizure - What is it? Is it dangerous? What to do? (March 2021).