Values

Sleep disorders can make children depressed


When a child has sleep problems, that is, is resistant and takes time to fall asleep, sleeps very few hours, has respiratory disorders during sleep, and also has daytime sleepiness, it may be one step away from having depression, if not treats them on time.

A study conducted by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, points out that sleep disorders are a trigger for childhood depression, and that only early treatment of childhood sleep disorders could protect children from developing depression.

Previously, studies indicated the genetic factor as the most important factor in explaining the association between sleep problems and depression in eight-year-old children. But now, it is noted that genes are less important, since it was observed that as the child grows, it is the non-shared environmental factors that become more important in the relationship between sleep disorders and depression. Fewer than half of the genetic sleep problems at age 10 are the same as at age eight. This shows that children's experiences with the environment are increasingly important as they grow up.

To reach these conclusions, the researchers studied 300 sets of twins born in England and Wales between 1994 and 1996. At seven years of age, their anxiety level was measured by parental reports. Behaviors related to anxiety were observed, including states of anxiety, shyness and fear. A total of 247 pairs of twins showed high levels of anxiety. At eight years of age, depressive symptoms were also analyzed, and two years later, depression levels were collected again.

Researchers argue that although childhood sleep problems are only a small influence on depression, it must be seriously considered and treated.These problems can negatively affect children's moods and moods, and lead to poor concentration. and a low academic performance.

You can read more articles similar to Sleep disorders can depress children, in the category of children's sleep on site.


Video: Anxiety and depression in kids: Healthy Head to Toe (December 2021).